3 Reasons Why Product Photography is a Thing of The Past

Photoshoots may seem a necessary spend for furniture manufacturers and retailers, but they are quickly becoming a thing of the past. And here are three reasons why.

Faster turnaround on the creation of marketing materials

  • If are on a tight deadline and need beautiful images fast, you may not have the time and resources to curate an impressive catalogue of images for your new range or product, which is the main component to furniture marketing and sales.

 

  • The process behind furniture photography is a lengthy one. A prototype is the first thing that needs to be made and transported to a set. The photoshoot itself and manpower needed is costly and time consuming, and then comes post-production. And if you need any alterations? You’ll likely need to reshoot the whole thing.

 

  • There are plenty of organisational issues involved with a photo shoot, creating plenty of room for errors. Delayed shipments, below par photographers, and a poor studio are all potential issues you can run into.

 

  • When it comes to creating that same photograph as a 3D render, the process is streamlined in every way. The only two things you need to consider are writing up the details of the project and the final approval stage.

 

  • No photoshoots or shipping involved.

Costs involved in furniture photography skyrocket compared to 3D rendering

  • Furniture photography can be costly, and there isn’t much of a way to get around that. If you’re looking to be as cost-effective as possible, getting a 3D render is usually the better choice.

 

  • With photography, the expenses pile up and eat away at your budget in no time at all.

 

  • Accounting for the cost of shipping a selection of traditional prototypes, you can also count on paying rent for a space to shoot your photos, as well as the cost of photographers and post-production. Even for a single photo shoot, your bill could be hefty. With any reshoots doubling or tripling that initial cost.

 

  • Now, if you’re rendering your product, most of these fees are eliminated. The only thing you have to pay for when it comes to a 3D render is the designer. Everything is created digitally, from the lighting and décor to the set and furniture itself.

Ability to make design changes on the fly

  • With a photograph, there’s a limit to the changes you can make after the fact. Post-production can touch up a photo, making the colour pop and changing the lighting. But no major alterations can be made to a still image.

 

  • If you need a substantial change, you’ll have to reshoot. This can be expensive and push your timeline back significantly.

 

  • With a 3D model, you can make all the changes you want without any extra time or money. Need to change the lightning? No problem. Wish there were a few more flowers in the background? That can be arranged (pun intended).

 

  • And if your product changes, or if you have a selection of fabrics available, all of that can be created and corrected in a 3D model in no time at all.

 

  • Your products can also be altered before they are even created. Manufacturing your prototype traditionally can be expensive. Accounting for colour options and variations, you’ll have to create multiple prototypes. Not to mention any changes you decide on means a whole new prototype needs to be manufactured. With 3D rendering, a product can be created from a mere sketch, and can be altered or redesigned in days. Along with this, if you are creating a whole new range but only have a design for one of your products in the range, leave it down to the graphic designers to create 3D prototypes of the remaining products in the range. From a sketch of a 3-seater sofa, you can have a render of a loveseat, an armchair and an ottoman to match in no time at all.

3D rendering makes sense for companies of all sizes, and let me tell you why. While photorealistic 3D rendering may sound like something out of reach for small companies, it doesn’t have to be. Regardless of how many products you have – even if it’s just one – you could benefit from a 3D render. When your design is going through changes, having a 3D render will allow you to easily manipulate the design, making changes on-the-go. This is important because it’ll allow buyers and designers to visualise the end-product. You can enjoy quick turnarounds for your marketing campaigns, without the extra time having to be put aside, once your prototype is made in 3D, your product launch can begin straight away, for sales to come rolling in.

 

If you need a helping hand or some advice when it comes to making the transition to 3D rendering, get in touch with us today. We are the experts.


Why Virtual Reality Will Soon Be the Only Way to Buy Furniture

Thanks to new technologies like augmented reality, 3D rendering and virtual reality, the furniture industry is finally ready to have its online moment. These are the latest tools designers and retailers are using to give clients a clearer vision of projects and purchases before they commit.

As we see the retail industry move away from brick and mortar we are seeing online only retailers start growing, in some areas overtaking high street shops. This is particularly surprising in the furniture and homewares sector, but we saw it in 2018 as online mattress companies like “Caspar” and “Emma” were topping mattress sales without a single brick and mortar shop. This really opens up a space for virtual reality as we see a gap in the market for endless opportunities to show products to the consumer without having to see a product in real life.

 

Books and music were the first products to really see success online. Without having to touch or feel the products, there was little standing in the way of a consumer clicking on the Buy Now button. Once user reviews were introduced into the mix, the ecommerce virus started taking hold of electronics too. When it came to clothing, it took a little more brain power. With consumers being used to trying on clothes and feeling the quality of fabrics, online apparel had a slow start. But it was nothing that next day delivery and free returns couldn’t fix.

 

Now, it’s furniture’s time to shine online, but the category requires completely new tactics. While user reviews help customers understand the quality and feel of products, they can’t help a buyer see how the piece actually fits in a room, which is the biggest obstacle we’re seeing when consumers consider the risks of buying online.

 

Furniture buying requires consumers to invest significant amounts of time and money choosing an item they will have to live with for many years. Add this to the thought that homeowners will want to see if a furniture piece fits in their space, and matches the current arrangements and products they already have in their home, virtual reality can really kick in.

We are seeing AR and VR crop up in certain home décor apps, even if it is still early and some are stilted. Take Dulux for example, although not perfect, their app allows you to take a photo of your room and place their paint colours on any wall, so you can preview the finished look without spending any time or money. Now imagine the success if this was available to interior designers and general homeowners in the realm of furniture. Superimposing that sofa you’ve been lusting after, into your current living room space – to scale – and in your chosen fabric. It’s important to envision the whole room, including pieces you own and pieces you’re considering purchasing. We don’t think that this new retail revolution is far off. But you know what they say – the early bird catches the worm. It is usually the businesses who nail these new approaches first that get the long-term results.

 

The future can be exciting, if maybe a little daunting. Orbital are working on their own Virtual Reality products to help retailers and manufacturers sell their products – keep your eyes peeled for updates!


Danish Delights at London Design Fair

Danish Delights - London Design Fair 2018

It was great to see the pavilion stand representing a variety of Danish brands at Design Week.

 

Showcasing products from Georg Jensen, Republic of Fritz Hansen, Warm Nordic, Junckers, Tom Rossae, Berhart and BoConcept, there was plenty for the eye to admire.

We loved the simple shaping, unfussy detail, the curved Danish form of low slung upholstery and the modern take of a dining chair that looked inspired, by the Hans J Wegner classic Wishbone.

 

Paper type hanging lanterns, that are reminiscent of paper planes crafted as a kid and authentic wood cubes (multi use, side tables or a footstool), with the detail of the grain. The white origami inspired hanging lanterns, which suggested movement were graceful and elegant, making a great focal statement piece for a room.

 

Lovely to see the classic Danish ‘butterfly’ type dining chair, upholstered for a change! In a gorgeous deep claret.